Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Saving Sakineh

July 5, 2010 9:29 pm by  
Filed under News, Women

While the east coast of the United States enjoyed idyllic weather (before the heat wave set in) and celebrated one of our most festive national holidays, a woman has been languishing for almost six years in an Iranian prison. Charged and convicted of “adultery” with what appears to be no proof, Sakineh received 99 lashes as her punishment. A barbaric act that her children were forced to watch. She has remained in prison ever since.

Now, for some unknown, or at least publicly unstated reason, the case has been reopened, and Sakineh has been sentenced to death by stoning. An international effort is being mounted to bring pressure to bear on the Iranian government to commute the sentence.

 

Several weeks ago, before this case gained world-wide attention, I rented a movie which I had heard about through my Afghan friends. The movie, titled “The Stoning of Soraya M” was the true story of another Iranian woman who had met this horrible fate. The film left me with images that I still cannot remove from my mind, which is why I am so horrified at the prospect of Sakineh meeting the same fate.

It is difficult to believe that in the 21st century, this barbarism is still practiced. This is not about cultural sensitivity or respecting another religion; this is about inhumane and murderous acts.

If you are on Facebook, please go to the “Save Sakineh” page and sign the petition that will hopefully be presented to the Iranian government. It will only take a minute and it just might help save her life.

Comments

5 Responses to “Saving Sakineh”
  1. Looking To Escape says:

    “It is difficult to believe that in the 21st century, this barbarism is still practiced. This is not about cultural sensitivity or respecting another religion; this is about inhumane and murderous acts”
    .
    Some cultures do prize certain behavior and have severe penalties for breaking those social codes.
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    It has been fairly pointed by other nations they see us with children getting shot down in the street, widespread pornography, drug addiction as us living in glass houses.
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    I do agree getting stoned to death is pretty harsh.
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    As I understand it, The Stoning Of Soraya M was the story of a woman set up on a false adultery charge by her husband so he could be rid of her. I have had the movie sitting in my Netflix queue for quite sometime and will be viewing it soon.

  2. Pamela Varkony says:

    Looking,

    Those situations you describe as our “glass house” are all social conditions they are not state sanctioned brutality and repression. One of our founding principles against “cruel and unusual punishment” protects us from such horror.

    I hope after you view “Soraya M”, you will let me know your impression. The movie is very well done, and yes it is a true story of a trumped up charge, which it appears is also the case with Sakineh, although for different motives.

  3. Looking To Escape says:

    I did watch the movie tonight.
    .
    First, your point on state sanctioned brutality are well taken.
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    While it is easy to try to make this movie a statement about religion, one must keep in mind the acts of secular regimes after 1900.
    .
    .
    “I hope after you view “Soraya M”, you will let me know your impression.”
    .
    I really liked Soraya’s aunt, but the heartlessness of Soraya’s husband was breath taking. I know husband’s and wives can grow to hate each other, but to take it to such an extreme… leaves one speechless.
    .
    May Soraya rest in peace after suffering the lies that had her murdered.
    .
    I do recommend watching this movie.

  4. Pamela Varkony says:

    Looking,

    I agree; I wish many more people would see this movie. For me, I don’t know which was worse, that her husband could do that to her or that her sons could.

    And you’re certainly correct about this not being about religion. Stalin was an atheist and one of the worlds greatest torturers and murderers.

  5. Looking To Escape says:

    “I agree; I wish many more people would see this movie. For me, I don’t know which was worse, that her husband could do that to her or that her sons could.”
    .
    Part of what left me speechless was thinking by now her sons must know how they were used by their dad so he could have some new and fresh love action. The sons have to live out their lives with the knowledge they helped murder their mother for no good reason at all.
    .
    The stoning punishment was from the Mosaic laws which the Muslims incorporated into their culture. If memory serves, those who brought false witness against someone were to face stoning as well for being a false witness was a grievous sin. In theory, both the husband and mechanic should have paid the penalty. I wonder if they ever payed for their crime or did they just get to walk away?

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